Behind the Spotlight

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The other day I was thinking about Jesus turning water to wine at the wedding in Cana (John 2).  This was Jesus’s first miracle and, as John tells us, “displayed His glory” (John 2:11).  When we hear of miracles and glory, our minds tend to think about the “wow” factor.  Turning water to wine is outside our normal experience; it’s fantastic.

Though quieter, I see another layer of glory in this miracle: Jesus cares about what concerns us.  Running out of wine would’ve disappointed the happy couple’s guests and embarrassed their families.  Saving face and supplying booze don’t seem high on the divine checklist.  In the grand scheme of things, they’re probably not.  But God cares for the sparrow; he also cares about our affairs.  And on a scale of importance, is anything truly unimportant if God notices it?

What really struck me, though, was that Jesus took no credit for any of it.  He didn’t trumpet this proof of His divine glory.  While mingling with guests, he didn’t casually say, “Great wine, eh?  Yeah, I whipped that up.  Just waved my hand over those water jars and presto!”  Jesus didn’t even slip the groom a note that said, “FYI, the wine ran out.  No worries.  Did a miracle and got you covered—JC.”  Only the servants (to whom no one would pay any mind) knew what Jesus did (John 2:9).

When the steward of the wedding feast talked up the wine in front of everyone, he congratulated the groom, who got all the credit.

How different, how *other* Jesus is!  In our day, imagine the book deals he could’ve landed to tell this story.  This isn’t to mention the book tour, speaking engagements, and other trappings of promotion.  All to the glory of God, of course 😉

As a writer, I can’t really throw stones at book deals or sharing the Lord through print.  I mean, here I am, blogging.

But I can, in everything, learn from the gentle, humble heart of Jesus (Matt. 11:29); I can seek to be shaped by Him and not my hopes for ministry.  After all, it is better to be nameless and faceless than godless.

In closing, I would ask you to pray for those you know that give themselves for Jesus without recognition or credit.  If you are one of those (and there are many more of us than not), be encouraged, and fellowship with the God of obscurity.  Be hidden with Him who is behind the spotlight, not in it.  He does wonders that others may shine!

 

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