Impossible People: Os Guinness

Recently, a group at church decided to read Impossible People by Os Guinness. I didn’t need a lot of convincing. Some liken him to C.S. Lewis because of his intellectual clarity on matters of faith. That sold me. Impossible People examines modernity’s challenge to Christian faith, a challenge Guinness believes is the most significant ever…

Bait and Switch: The True Gospel

This post is by my friend, Cameron Fultz.  Cameron is author of several books, including Jesus Pictures and Spiritual Knowledge.  Above all else, Cam desires to know Jesus in His death and resurrection. *** How many have heard a gospel invitation to be saved from hell so you can go to heaven or to ask Jesus into your…

Augustine: Exposition on Psalms

Augustine (354-430 AD) was a bishop in north Africa.  He remains one of the most influential thinkers in church history.  Augustine is known for books like City of God, in which he explained Rome’s fall: Rome typified the city of man which isn’t eternal.  Instead of looking to Rome, Christians look “to the city that has…

Seeing God through the Ashes

Months ago, my wife’s friend plugged a book on social media, The Book of Job: Seeing God through the Ashes, by Melissa Lees.  I felt curious for some reason (God?). Perhaps the topic piqued my interest.  (People aren’t exactly rushing to exposit Job).  Whatever it was, I downloaded a copy to my Kindle. I rarely read modern Christian…

On Loving God–Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard of Clairvaux was a monk in the 11th and 12th centuries. Bernard enjoys wide appeal.  After reading his classic, On Loving God, I understand why.  This book has a refreshing, simple focus on loving God.  It is not a work of dazzling theological argument but evokes 1 Corinthians 8:2-3: “If anyone thinks he knows anything,…

P.S. to “An Apology”

Recently, I posted about “An Apology for the True Christian Divinity.”  Written by Robert Barclay, this was the first orderly presentation of early Quaker beliefs.  Early Quakers were deeply Christian while many later Quakers drifted from Christ into subjectivism. One of my readers left a comment  wondering why later Quakers left their Christian roots.  I suggested that…

An Apology for the True Christian Divinity–Barclay

Last year, I became acquainted with Quakerism. I thought Quakers peddled new age, oatmeal mysticism. I was surprised to learn of their deeply Christian origins. I began to read the writings of George Fox, founder of the Quaker movement. Next, I moved on to An Apology for the True Christian Divinity by Robert Barclay (1675)….

Soul-Jars of Christ–Cameron Fult

I’d like to thank Cameron Fultz for sharing this post.  Cameron is a friend of mine and author of Spiritual Knowledge and Jesus Pictures *** Yes, “soul-jar” is a silly pun on “soldier”. But this is the kind of soldier we are; not one of force, but vessels of Christ crucified, the Treasure inside. The power of God…

(In)Fidel Castro

Since his death last week, there has been no shortage of fawning news articles about Fidel Castro.  (And no, these weren’t Cuban news articles. They were American).   I had the distinct displeasure of reading two of them recently.  One opened by calling Castro a fiery apostle of revolution.  The other went on and on…

The Quakers: More than Oatmeal

For awhile now, the Lord has been teaching me about Christ’s indwelling. Knowing that I no longer live but Christ lives in me has become a daily necessity rather than an abstract proposition (Gal. 2:19-20). In the midst of this emphasis, I discovered the writings of George Fox, who started the Quaker movement in the…

Seeing the Father–Cameron Fultz

  The following is by my friend, Cameron Fultz.  Carmeron has done guest-posts on The Voice of One before.  His books are available at Amazon. *** As of late certain passages of the Bible about seeing the Father have stood out to me. John 1:18 says, “No one has ever seen God; the only God,…

Headwaters

Better to sit at the waters’ birth, Than a sea of waves to win; To live in the love that floweth forth, Than the love that cometh in. Be thy heart a well of love, my child, Flowing, and free, and sure; For a cistern of love, though undefiled, Keeps not the spirit pure from Phantastes…